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Election Law Symposium

  Introduction
     
  Participants
     
  Primary Paper Abstracts
     
  Election 2000 Resources
     


Participants

Steve Bickerstaff is a visiting professor at the University of Texas School of Law, where he teaches constitutional and election law. He has practiced election law for over 20 years and has represented clients in statewide recounts in Texas.

Richard Briffault is the Joseph P. Chamberlain Professor of Legislation at Columbia Law School, where he teaches election law as well as state and local government law. He is the author of "Who Rules at Home? One Person, One Vote and Local Governments," 60 University of Chicago Law Review 339 (1993) and "Political Parties and Campaign Finance Reform," 100 Columbia Law Review 620 (2000), as well as many other articles on local government and election law.

Guy-Uriel Charles is an associate professor at the University of Minnesota Law School, where he teaches voting rights and civil procedure. He is author of "Challenges to Racial Redistricting in the New Millennium: Hunt v. Cromartie as a Case Study," 58 Washington & Lee Law Review __ (forthcoming 2001) (with Luis Fuentes-Rohwer).

James Gardner is a professor at Western New England School of Law, where he specializes in election and state constitutional law. His articles include "Can Party Politics Be Virtuous?," 100 Columbia Law Review 667 (2000), "Southern Character, Confederate Nationalism, and the Interpretation of State Constitutions," 76 Texas Law Review 1219 (1998), and "Liberty, Community and the Constitutional Structure of Political Influence: A Reconsideration of the Right to Vote," 145 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 893 (1997).

Elizabeth Garrett is a professor and Deputy Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Chicago Law School. Before teaching, she clerked for the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall (1989-90). She has published "The Law and Economics of 'Informed Voter' Ballot Notations," 85 Virginia Law Review 1533 (1999), and Cases and Materials on Legislation: Statutes and the Creation of Public Policy (West Group 2001) (with William Eskridge and Philip Frickey).

Heather K. Gerken is an assistant professor at Harvard Law School, where she teaches a course on the law of democracy. Prior to teaching, she clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter (1995-96). Her scholarship, focusing on the role groups play in democracy and on translating structural democratic norms into an individual-rights system, includes "Understanding the Right to an Undiluted Vote," 114 Harvard Law Review __ (forthcoming 2001).

Steven Gey is the Fonvielle & Hinkle Professor at Florida State University College of Law, where he teaches constitutional and civil rights law. A scholar of the First Amendment, Professor Gey's articles include "The Nuremberg Files and the First Amendment Value of Threats," 78 Texas Law Review 541 (2000), "The Case Against Postmodern Censorship Theory," 145 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 193 (1996), and "The Unfortunate Revival of Civic Republicanism," 141 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 801 (1993).

Richard Hasen is a professor and William M. Rains Fellow at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles, where he teaches election law. He is the author of Election Law: Cases and Materials (Carolina Academic Press, 2d ed. 2001) (with Daniel Lowenstein), "Vote Buying," 88 California Law Review 1323 (2000), "Shrink Missouri, Campaign Finance, and the 'Thing that Wouldn't Leave,'" 17 Constitutional Commentary __ (forthcoming 2000), "Do the Parties Or the People Own the Electoral Process?," 148 University of Pennsylvania Law Review __ (forthcoming 2000), and "The Surprisingly Complex Case fo Disclosure of Contributions and Expenditures Funding Sham Issue Advocacy," 48 UCLA Law Review __ (forthcoming 2000).

Pamela Karlan is the Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law at Stanford University. She has also taught at the University of Virginia School of Law and clerked for the U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun (1985-86). A nationally known scholar of election law, she is co-author of The Law of Democracy: Legal Structure of the Political Process (Foundation Press 1998) (with Samuel Issacharoff and Richard Pildes) and author of "The Fire Next Time: Reapportionment After the 2000 Census," 50 Stanford Law Review 731 (1998).

Harold Krent is a professor and associate dean at Chicago-Kent College of Law, where he teaches constitutional, administrative and criminal law. He has authored The Puzzling Boundary Between Criminal and Civil Retroactive Lawmaking, 84 Georgetown Law Journal 2143 (1996) and "Separating the Strands in Separation of Powers Controversies," 74 Virginia Law Review 1253 (1988).

Sandy Levinson is the W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood, Jr. Centennial Chair in Law and Professor of Government at the University of Texas. An eminent scholar of the politics of constitutional law, he is author of Constitutional Faith (Princeton, 1988) and Written in Stone (Duke, 1998), and editor or co-editor of Constitutional Stupidities, Constitutional Tragedies (NYU, 1998), Responding to Imperfection: The Theory and Practice of Constitutional Amendment (Princeton, 1995), Interpreting Law & Literature: A Hermeneutic Reader (Northwestern, 1988), and Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking (Aspen Publishing 2000) (with Paul Brest, Jack Balkin, & Akhil Amar).

William Marshall was recently appointed professor of law at the University of North Carolina, following several years on the faculty at Case Western Reserve University School of Law. He served as the Deputy Counsel and Deputy Assistant to the U.S. President (1999-2001). He has written extensively on election and constitutional law issues, including "The Last Best Chance for Campaign Reform," 94 Northwestern University Law Review 335 (2000) and "American Political Culture and the Failures of Process Federalism," 22 Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy 139 (1998).

John O. McGinnis is a professor at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, where he teaches administrative and constitutional law. Before joining the Cardozo faculty he was a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Office of Legal Counsel in the Reagan and Bush administrations. Among his recent articles are "The World Trade Constitution," 114 Harvard Law Review 512 (2000) (with M. Movsesian) and "Against the Scribes: Campaign Finance Reform Revisited," 24 Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy __ (forthcoming 2000).

Spencer Overton is an acting professor at UC Davis School of Law, where he teaches a course in election law. He is a director of the National Voting Rights Institute (www.nvri.org) and author of "Mistaken Identity: Unveiling the Property Characteristics of Political Money," 53 Vanderbilt Law Review 1235 (2000).

Richard Pildes is a professor at New York University School of Law. Prior to teaching, he clerked for the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall (1984-85). A noted scholar in application of rational choice theory to public law, he is co-author of The Law of Democracy: Legal Structure of the Political Process (Foundation Press 1998) (with Samuel Issacharoff and Pamela Karlan) and author of many articles on election law, including "Expressive Harms, 'Bizarre Districts,' and Voting Rights: Evaluating Election-District Appearances After Shaw v. Reno," 92 Michigan Law Review 483 (1993) (with Richard Niemi).

Robert Pushaw is a professor at the University of Missouri School of Law. His scholarship examines the influence of Federalist political theory on modern constitutional law, with a special focus on the justiciability doctrines, separation of powers, and the Commerce Clause. He is the author of "Justiciability and Separation of Powers: A Neo Federalist Approach," 81 Cornell Law Review 393 (1996) and "Article III's Case/Controversy Distinction and the Dual Functions of Federal Courts," 69 Notre Dame Law Review 447 (1994).

Jim Rossi is the Dore Professor at Florida State University College of Law and a visiting professor at the University of Texas School of Law. His articles on state administrative procedure and political participation include "Institutional Design and the Lingering Legacy of Antifederalist Separation of Powers Ideals in the States," 52 Vanderbilt Law Review 1167 (1999) and "Participation Run Amok: The Costs of Mass Participation for Deliberative Agency Decisionmaking," 92 Northwestern University Law Review 173 (1997).

Robert Schapiro is an associate professor at Emory University School of Law, where he teaches constitutional law. He clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens. A leading scholar of federalism and state constitutional interpretation, his publications include "Judicial Deference and Interpretive Coordinacy in State and Federal Constitutional Law," 85 Cornell Law Review 656 (2000), "Polyphonic Federalism: State Constitutions in the Federal Courts," 87 California Law Review 1409 (1999), and "Identity and Interpretation in State Constitutional Law," 84 Virginia Law Review 389 (1998).

Mark Seidenfeld is a professor at Florida State University College of Law, where he teaches constitutional and administrative law. A scholar of the law, economics and politics of the federal administrative law process, his articles include "A Big Picture Approach to Presidential Influence on Agency Policy-Making," 80 Iowa Law Review 1 (1994) and "A Civic Republican Justification for the Bureaucratic State," 105 Harvard Law Review 1511 (1992).

Peter Shane is a professor and former dean at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law and a Visiting Professor of Law and Public Policy, H.J. Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management, Carnegie Mellon University. Professor Shane is co-author of Separation of Powers Law: Cases and Materials (Carolina Academic Press 1996) (with Harold Bruff) and Administrative Law: The American Public Law System (West Group, 4th ed. 1998) (with Jerry Mashaw and Richard Merrill), as well as author of "Voting Rights and the 'Statutory Constitution,'" 56 Law & Contemporary Problems, 243 (1993).

Nat Stern is the Frost Professor at Florida State University College of Law. The author of many works on constitutional law, he has published "Private Concerns of Private Plaintiffs: Revisiting a Problematic Defamation Category," 65 Missouri Law Review 597 (2000) and "The Political Question Doctrine in State Courts," 35 South Carolina Law Review 405 (1984).

Charles Tiefer is an associate professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law. From 1984-95, he served as Solicitor and Deputy General Counsel for the U.S. House of Representatives. He is the author numerous articles on separation of powers and government contracts law, as well as Congressional Practice and Procedure (Greenwood Press, 1989) and The Semi-Sovereign President (Westview Press, 1994).

Thomas Warner is Solicitor General for the State of Florida and occupies the Erwin Chair at Florida State University College of Law.

Ernest Young is an assistant professor at the University of Texas School of Law. He clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter (1995-96). Known for his federal courts scholarship, he is the author of "Constitutional Avoidance, Resistance Norms, and the Preservation of Judicial Review," 78 Texas Law Review 1549 (2000) and "Hercules, Herbert, and Amar: The Trouble with Intratextualism," 113 Harvard Law Review 730 (2000) (with Adrian Vermeule).

 

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